PEOPLE & PLACES

PEOPLE & PLACES
After another record-setting year, the Asheville Regional Airport adds two new direct destinations

Meet the once-reluctant hotelier behind the Parkway’s Pisgah Inn

For Page Ives Lemel, running a 100-year-old girls’ camp has always been a family affair

The WNC Sports Hall of Fame and its organizers build a legacy, and a future, for mountain athletes

Gini Crowder-Marshall designs stylish settings for the world’s largest furniture markets

Tracing the origin of WNC’s preeminent marketing phrase, Land of the Sky

A new history of Asheville’s Jewish community

Seed libraries cultivate home gardeners and wholesome food

One tribal member expands efforts to teach the Cherokee’s traditional tongue

How a California girl became a Carolina gal

Last spring, we invited amateur and professional photographers alike to enter our inaugural Images of Western North Carolina Photo Contest, and with so much here to inspire a shutterbug’s focus, more than 600 submissions flooded in. Check out the finalists’ photos as well as the winners of the Amateur and Professional categories on these pages, then visit wncmagazine.com to view other honorable mentions and vote for your overall favorite by January 31. The Readers’ Choice winner will be announced in our March/April issue.

Poet Ellen Bryant Voigt, founder of Warren Wilson College’s writing program, is honored with a MacArthur Genius Award

Boone professor Ray Russell’s amateur interest in meteorology sparked the region’s top forecasting service

Martin Luther King Jr. visited WNC at two turning points that shaped the civil rights struggle

Sometimes, smaller is better.

Waynesville Soda Jerks brings natural local flavors to soft drinks

It’s gone to the birds at Duck Dance Farm, a waterfowl conservation venture in Burnsville

A color-coded nutrition program cultivates healthy preschoolers at the Verner Center and beyond

For decades, Boone was the capitol of North Carolina-made sauerkraut

A one-of-a-kind collection of aluminum Christmas trees returns to the Transylvania Heritage Museum

A new series of signs highlights the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area’s cultural cornerstones

Light shows, each with their own particular glow, illuminate the holidays

A Morganton couple aims to spread monuments to the country’s founding documents far and wide

Touring Asheville with Jude Law, a local writer ponders the weight of Thomas Wolfe

At Hart Square in Catawba County, a man with a passion for historic structures keeps the past alive

A new book by Steve Inskeep illuminates the personalities behind a tragedy for the Cherokee

Get to know local history through new exhibits at area heritage museums

Appalachian State University launches an exchange program in Havana

A Madison County program brings advanced literacy skills to rural girls

UNC Asheville students document life 100 years ago, when the United States was on the brink of war

Throughout Western North Carolina sit dozens of public schools abandoned by time, consolidation, and changing demographics. In their heyday, they were community epicenters and veritable second homes for thousands of students. Today, some are boarded up, while others await imminent demolition and replacement by new state-of-the-art facilities. But there are also a handful of old schoolhouses tucked away in various corners of the mountains that have found new purpose as community centers, concert venues, historical beacons, and artists’ studios. Here’s a look at the past and present of eight of them.

Throughout Western North Carolina sit dozens of public schools abandoned by time, consolidation, and changing demographics. In their heyday, they were community epicenters and veritable second homes for thousands of students. Today, some are boarded up, while others await imminent demolition and replacement by new state-of-the-art facilities. But there are also a handful of old schoolhouses tucked away in various corners of the mountains that have found new purpose as community centers, concert venues, historical beacons, and artists’ studios. Here’s a look at the past and present of eight of them.

Hugging the banks of the North Toe River, surrounded by blue-tinged mountains, the rural Mitchell County town of Spruce Pine holds a rich history, one with tales of trains and commerce, a hoard of minerals, and a nationally recognized theater. After falling in love with the community and learning of its heritage, Boone-based events planner Elizabeth Hempfling decided to pay homage. “I wanted to do something that portrayed love, but wanted it to be unique and to mean something,” she says. Hempfling staged a photo project that offers period recreations of Spruce Pine’s past, from the early 1900s to the 1950s, as well as snapshots of the thriving community today. In all, some 30 local residents pooled resources and time to stage, style, and snap pictures over four days. The result is a nostalgic portrayal of the town’s story, told with passion and reverence.

Three nonprofits improve lives through creative expression

Forty years after Elvis rocked Asheville, the city’s still all shook up about it

Lend a hand to the arts this summer

The first full documentary on Nina Simone shows how she carried her talent, and rage, from Tryon to the world stage

Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center welcomes its first official director

Potter Reiko Miyagi brings deep meaning to her ceramics

Roan Mountain’s Cloudland Hotel once served as an elevated destination for naturalists